Global Information Technology Report 2014 - France - Dare to be better ? OK !

Publié le 14 Novembre 2014

Global Information Technology Report 2014 - France - Dare to be better ? OK !

The Global Information Technology Report 2014

Global Information Technology Report 2014 - France - Dare to be better ? OK !

The GITR analyses the latest development in the ICT industry that impact national development and benchmarks national performance via the Networked Readiness Index (NRI).

The Index measures the ability of economies to leverage ICT to boost competitiveness and well-being. Covering 148 economies, the index identifies the main drivers for ICT development and its impacts, as assessed by the 54 indicators, structured in a four dimensions-framework.

The four dimensions are: Environment (political, regulatory and business environment), ICT Readiness, ICT Usage, Impact of ICT.

".../... The 13th edition of The Global Information Technology Report is released at a time when economies need to solidify the recovery of the past year and leave the worst financial and economic crisis of the past 80 years behind.

I never cease to be amazed by the speed of innovation.
Change is the only true constant, and each year the pace of change only accelerates. Transitions that once took place over three or five years now happen in 12 to 18 months.

I believe we are currently experiencing the biggest fundamental change the world has seen since the initial development of the Internet as people, processes,
data, and things become increasingly connected.

We call this the Internet of Everything (IoE), and it is having a profound impact on individuals, businesses, communities, and countries. According to analysis
conducted by Cisco, the Internet of Everything represents a US$19 trillion global opportunity to create value over the next decade through greater profits for businesses as well as improved citizen services, cost efficiencies, and increased revenues for governments and other public-sector organizations.

Several major transitions in technology—each important in its own right—are combining to make the Internet of Everything possible. These include the
emergence of cloud and mobile computing, the growth of big data and analytics, and the explosive development of the Internet of Things (IoT). These transitions are changing the role of information technology (IT), with Internet protocol (IP) networks playing an increasingly central part by seamlessly connecting disparate IT environments. Cisco’s contribution to this edition of The Global Information Technology Report focuses on the how IP networks facilitate new information flows through the interaction between two of these transitions: IoT and
data analytics.

Several major transitions in technology—each important in its own right—are combining to make the Internet of Everything possible. These include the
emergence of cloud and mobile computing, the growth of big data and analytics, and the explosive development of the Internet of Things (IoT). These transitions are changing the role of information technology (IT), with Internet protocol (IP) networks playing an increasingly central part by seamlessly connecting disparate IT environments. Cisco’s contribution to this edition of The Global Information Technology Report focuses on the how IP networks facilitate new information flows through the interaction between two of these transitions: IoT and
data analytics.

In our 30-year history, our success has been based on our ability to see around corners, identify market transitions, and make big bets on what is next—such as
the emergence of the Internet of Everything. We have seen this before, in the transitions from bridged networks to routed networks, shared networks to switched ones, circuit switching to packet switching, fixed connectivity to mobile connectivity, dedicated resources to virtual ones, data traffic to voice and video traffic, PC connections to any-device connections, and physical data centers to the cloud.

We see the network as the critical accelerator and enabler in all of these transitions, transforming processes to increase efficiency and decrease costs. In
data centers, for example, the network is the common element for intelligence, scale, and flexibility. Data centers have evolved as more intelligence has been built into the network—from networking virtual machines and developing a platform optimizing computing to scaling applications and decoupling them from the server or data center in which they live.

The network also facilitates the growth of applications, a key driver of the Internet of Everything.

Applications already provide an integral way that consumers experience the Internet of Everything, with the number of applications growing from 10 billion
downloads in 2010 to 77 billion by 2014.

As this trend continues, we expect the Internet of Everything to drive massive gains in efficiency, business growth, and quality of life, helped along by thousands of new IoT applications. These applications will require building new end-to-end IoT infrastructures, which will enable the deployment of even more IoT applications.

We are pleased to collaborate again with the World Economic Forum and INSEAD to produce The Global Information Technology Report and the Networked Readiness Index (NRI). The NRI provides policymakers,
business leaders, and concerned citizens with valuable insights into current market conditions and the state of connectivity across the world, and helps to identify where more can be done to accelerate the Internet of Everything’s positive impact on the world in which we live.

JOHN CHAMBERS, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cisco Systems

When The Global Information Technology Report (GITR) and the Networked Readiness Index (NRI) were created more than 13 years ago, the attention of decision makers was focused on how to develop strategies that would allow them to benefit from what Time Magazine had described as “the new economy”: a new way of organizing and managing economic activity based on the new opportunities that the Internet provided for businesses.1 At present, the world is slowly emerging from one of the worst financial and economic crises in decades, and policymakers, business leaders, and civil society are looking into new opportunities that can consolidate growth, generate new employment, and create business opportunities.

BEÑAT BILBAO-OSORIO, World Economic Forum

The Networked Readiness Index 2014

Rank Country/Economy Value / 2013 rank (out of 144)
1 Finland 6.04 1
2 Singapore 5.97 2
3 Sweden 5.93 3
4 Netherlands 5.79 4
5 Norway 5.70 5
6 Switzerland 5.62 6
7 United States 5.61 9
8 Hong Kong SAR 5.60 14
9 United Kingdom 5.54 7
10 Korea, Rep. 5.54 11
11 Luxembourg 5.53 16
12 Germany 5.50 13
13 Denmark 5.50 8
14 Taiwan, China 5.47 10
15 Israel 5.42 15
16 Japan 5.41 21
17 Canada 5.41 12
18 Australia 5.40 18
19 Iceland 5.30 17
20 New Zealand 5.27 20
21 Estonia 5.27 22
22 Austria 5.26 19
23 Qatar 5.22 23
24 United Arab Emirates 5.20 25
25 France 5.09 26 <-------------------- FRANCE, 25 eme rang
26 Ireland 5.07 27
27 Belgium 5.06 24
28 Malta 4.96 28
29 Bahrain 4.86 29
30 Malaysia 4.83 30
31 Lithuania 4.78 32
32 Saudi Arabia 4.78 31
33 Portugal 4.73 33
34 Spain 4.69 38
35 Chile 4.61 34
36 Slovenia 4.60 37
37 Cyprus 4.60 35
38 Kazakhstan 4.58 43
39 Latvia 4.58 41
40 Oman 4.56 40
41 Puerto Rico 4.54 36
42 Czech Republic 4.49 42
43 Panama 4.36 46
44 Jordan 4.36 47
45 Brunei Darussalam 4.34 57
46 Croatia 4.34 51
47 Hungary 4.32 44
48 Mauritius 4.31 55
49 Azerbaijan 4.31 56
50 Russian Federation 4.30 54
51 Turkey 4.30 45
52 Montenegro 4.27 48
53 Costa Rica 4.25 53
54 Poland 4.24 49
55 Barbados 4.22 39
56 Uruguay 4.22 52
57 Macedonia, FYR 4.19 67
58 Italy 4.18 50
59 Slovak Republic 4.12 61
60 Georgia 4.09 65
61 Mongolia 4.07 59
62 China 4.05 58
63 Colombia 4.05 66
64 Indonesia 4.04 76
65 Armenia 4.03 82
66 Seychelles 4.02 79
67 Thailand 4.01 74
68 Bosnia and Herzegovina 3.99 78
69 Brazil 3.98 60
70 South Africa 3.98 70
71 Trinidad and Tobago 3.97 72
72 Kuwait 3.96 62
73 Bulgaria 3.96 71
74 Greece 3.95 64
Rank Country/Economy Value
2013 rank
(out of 144)
75 Romania 3.95 75
76 Sri Lanka 3.94 69
77 Moldova 3.89 77
78 Philippines 3.89 86
79 Mexico 3.89 63
80 Serbia 3.88 87
81 Ukraine 3.87 73
82 Ecuador 3.85 91
83 India 3.85 68
84 Vietnam 3.84 84
85 Rwanda 3.78 88
86 Jamaica 3.77 85
87 Tunisia 3.77 n/a
88 Guyana 3.77 100
89 Cape Verde 3.73 81
90 Peru 3.73 103
91 Egypt 3.71 80
92 Kenya 3.71 92
93 Dominican Republic 3.69 90
94 Bhutan 3.68 n/a
95 Albania 3.66 83
96 Ghana 3.65 95
97 Lebanon 3.64 94
98 El Salvador 3.63 93
99 Morocco 3.61 89
100 Argentina 3.53 99
101 Guatemala 3.52 102
102 Paraguay 3.47 104
103 Botswana 3.43 96
104 Iran, Islamic Rep. 3.42 101
105 Namibia 3.41 111
106 Venezuela 3.39 108
107 Gambia, The 3.38 98
108 Cambodia 3.36 106
109 Lao PDR 3.34 n/a
110 Zambia 3.34 115
111 Pakistan 3.33 105
112 Nigeria 3.31 113
113 Suriname 3.30 117
114 Senegal 3.30 107
115 Uganda 3.25 110
116 Honduras 3.24 109
117 Zimbabwe 3.24 116
118 Kyrgyz Republic 3.22 118
119 Bangladesh 3.21 114
120 Bolivia 3.21 119
121 Liberia 3.19 97
122 Côte d'Ivoire 3.14 120
123 Nepal 3.09 126
124 Nicaragua 3.08 125
125 Tanzania 3.04 127
126 Swaziland 3.00 136
127 Mali 3.00 122
128 Gabon 2.98 121
129 Algeria 2.98 131
130 Ethiopia 2.95 128
131 Cameroon 2.94 124
132 Malawi 2.90 129
133 Lesotho 2.88 138
134 Sierra Leone 2.85 143
135 Benin 2.82 123
136 Burkina Faso 2.78 130
137 Mozambique 2.77 133
138 Libya 2.75 132
139 Madagascar 2.74 137
140 Yemen 2.73 139
141 Timor-Leste 2.69 134
142 Mauritania 2.61 135
143 Haiti 2.52 141
144 Angola 2.52 n/a
145 Guinea 2.48 140
146 Myanmar 2.35 n/a
147 Burundi 2.31 144
148 Chad 2.22 142

read more : http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalInformationTechnology_Report_2014.pdf​

Dare to be better ? OK !

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